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Both rotors use split oil drums for vanes. The drums are standard 45 Imperial gallon (55 US
gallon) oil drums, which are available throughout most of the world; approximate dimensions of
each drum are 34" (86cm) high x 20" (51cm) diameter.
A two-stage rotor, such as Rotor #1, which uses four half-drums, will produce approximately
twice the power input of a one-stage rotor using two half-drums.A three-stage rotor such as
Rotor #2, using six half-drums, will produce approximately three times the power input of a one-
stage rotor.
A rotor having more than three stages would require design modifications, and would be difficult
to build in rural conditions.
This is a two-stage S-rotor. A connecting shaft is attached to a positive-displacement rotary
borehole (submersible) pump, manufactured by Mono Pumps (Engineering) Ltd. In England.
Water is pushed up the borehole by a rotating screw-like mechanism. The vanes of the S-rotor
are placed so the wind will turn the rotor in the same (counterclockwise--looking from the top)
direction as that in which the Mono pump operates.
Using a rotary pump of this type enables a direct rotor/ pump hook-up--with an extension piece
connecting the S-rotor shaft to the shaft extending down the borehole to the pump. IF YOU USE
A ROTARY PUMP MADE TO OPERATE IN A CLOCKWISE DIRECTION, MAKE SURE
TO REVERSE THE DIRECTION OF ALL THE S-ROTOR, VANES FROM THAT SHOWN
IN THESE PLANS.
VITA offers a number of technical bulletins containing plans for pumps.
If you choose a pump that uses a reciprocating (back and forth) motion to lift the water, you will
have to devise a mechanism to convert the rotary motion of the rotor to this kind of movement.
Expect a certain loss in efficiency. Diaphragm pumps may be used if placed on the ground
surface over a low head (that is, they cannot easily be rigged to operate down a borehole).
MATERIALS
*2 standard 45 Imperial gallon (55 US gallon) oil drums
*One and a half 4x8' sheets of 1/2" thick plywood. 3 discs of 46" diameter will be cut from
these. Marine quality plywood is best.
*About 45' of 2x4" wood, for rotor support frame. 2 pieces must have a continuous length of
about 13' each.
*1 wood beam, 4"x4"x6'
*About an 8' section of straight pipe (preferably steel), nominal (approximate) outside diameter
of 1 1/4".
*About 1 sq. ft. of 1/4" thick flat mild steel sheet; about a 7" length of mild steel tube, with an
inside diameter large enough to slide over the 1 1/4" pipe (above), and 1/4" wall thickness.
These are to fabricate disc support brackets.
*1 1 1/2' of solid steel bar, for shaft end pieces. See "MAKE SHAFT END PIECES" (page 21)
for further considerations.
*2 roller bearings, 1" minimum inside (shaft) diameter, with housings.
The bottom bearing must be self-aligning in all directions.See "BEARINGS," page 18.
*Bolts. Nuts are not listed each bolt will take a nut of the appropriate size.Note: Bolt lengths
are measured from the undersurface of the head to the tip.