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If either of the bearings you use is adjustable with set-screws, you may further adjust for smooth
movement. Loosen the bearing slightly from the mount to make these adjustments; then re-
tighten.
NOTE:New bearings may be stiff until they are broken in a little, Because of the (grease)
packing. Turn the rotor a number of times to begin this process. Do not confuse tight movement
with rough movement.
Final adjustments may best be made when the rotor is in its final, vertical position.
INSTALL THE FRAME IN THE GROUND AND SUPPORT WITH GUY WIRES
Determine where you will place your anchors and bury them in the ground, with the connectors
for the guy wires remaining above ground.
Attach screw eyes, or some other strong connectors, near the top of the rotor frame and fasten
guy wires to them.
Dig two holes 2 or 3' deep, 8' apart. Raise the rotor and frame up vertically, placing the vertical
supports into the holes.This is at least a six-man job. The bottom of the rotor itself should be at
least waist high. Pack earth firmly around the vertical supports in the holes.
Pull guy wires tight through the connectors in the anchors, and fasten them. Turnbuckles
installed along the wires will help you adjust the wires for maximum tightness.
Read through the last few paragraphs of "FINAL ASSEMBLY," Rotor #1 beginning with the
last paragraph on page 27. The same basic considerations apply (excepting any planing of the
beams).
CONSTRUCT AND INSTALL ACCESSORY EQUIPMENT
Rotor Brake
A hand-operated brake can slow or stop the rotor in high winds that might damage it.Attach a
rubber-padded wood pole (of about 2" diameter) on a hinge to the vertical support next to the
rotor, at the exact height of the wood edge of the bottom rotor disc (that is, not over the groove
where the transmission belt will be). A spring keeps the brake lever away from the disc. Pull a
cord (running through a guide attached to the vertical support) to bring the rubber-padded end of
the lever against the rotor disc.
<FIGURE 37>
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